Prolog

The Awakening of the Hinterland

What if all historic houses would vanish? Can you imagine that?

Would you recognize if there’d be no more churches, no half-timbered houses, no brick barns, no cottages, no manor houses, no castles? Whenever an old house is being teared off – no matter how shabby it looked – I am grieving for the loss of history that has been buried. Being brought up in the rather rural part of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, the farest Eastern part of Germany and former GDR-Territory, my eyes are familiar with villages dominated by red bricks and half-timbered houses. I mainly grew up in a WBS-70s panel. I was never specifically trained to pay attention to old buildings, I cannot recall someone saying to me: Look at this beauty! Have you noticed the lovely beaver tails shingles! And oh, that iron piece of art of a frontdoorknob, marvelous!

For as long as I remember I feel an inexplicable fondness of historic houses to an extent that could probably best compared to the love of distant but dear relatives – your fathers aunt or mothers funky uncle, someone for whom you feel this deep affection for. Those ones with an outstanding character, whom you will quote all your life long. Old houses can have the quality of ancestors. If you take an interest in them, they tell you stories of times long gone – full of wonders, some of bitterness. Of hard work, of times which were shaped a humble attitudes towards life which we as people oft he 21st century can hardly imagine. They give us hints on how life was being lived by then, some of it we still continue to adapt, just like using clay and reed for the walls, but you (probably) never ever again find a contemporary house with ceilings charmed by stucco.

Houses don’t care about people, though. It’s a oneside love, unconditional, in a way. But as they give you this pleasant shiver you start to think the house wants you to linger a little more. Because otherwise it would make no sense. You start to think, that the house needs you, although it is rather true that you need an excuse for the feelings which seem to come out of the blue. I guess it is no daring to say that the majestatic appearance of a manor houses will never stop to impress us. And as your eyes wander around it you start to wonder, what the former owners were like, whose children were born under this roof, what fights might have been fought, what promises were made. You try to imagine the cheerful moments of peace and candlelight, you want to listen to stories which were told around the fireplace. You try to imagine suffering refugees this house has sheltered, silent but firm during years of war.

To this day manor houses spread this athmosphere of legends, of hidden secrets, which you want to find out about while you admire those old beaver tail shingles, who are covered with bits of moss which have been lying up there for more than a hundred years. And you think of the strength of each single shingle which gave it’s best to protect the house against all kinds of wetness and winds, just like those houses resisted the changes of times and seasons. Some of them for more than 400 years, other „only“ for 170. And before you realise it, you fall in love. You start to care about the house which might be a ruin still. You want to protect it, you want to maintain it, you even imagine to live in it. Perhaps that’s their secret for their staying power: Their unique beauty, which will never be found likewise in a new build house.

You can call me nostalgic, or oldschool. I like vintage, I like antiques. I like the smell of a dusty attic, old wood. I like Vinyl, I like Oldtimer, I love books. I have too many of them yet unread, but the way they hold words pressed into paper like tattoo they appear as an antidote to this ultimate loss of substance as the world turns faster and starts to move into a sphere where we start to mainly live on a screen. I like to stress, though, that by all my fondness of the past, I consider myself as a modern person – I am a huge fan of Spotify, I even adapted to Online-Banking and to smartphones. I like Instagram and recently I fell for an Austrian hipsterband.

So who am I?

Hi there! I am Annika. Journalist, countryside-bigcity-hybrid, Hinterland-explorer. I have the privilege to take you with me on my excursion through the Baltic Hinterland as an official ambassador of Baltic manor houses due to this fantastic EU-Project. What Hinterland, you might wonder? The term originates in the German language but has been adapted by several European fellow countries way back in the 19th century, as L’hinterland by our French neighbours or, even more fancy, as Hinterlândia. The Hinterland is characterised as a rather rural area with poor infrastructure, far away from cities and limited possibilities to make a living. But these days, it is the place to be when it comes to vacation-adventures which are meant to leave an impact on you.

The Hinterland might be poor of Sea water but it’s rich of inspiring people who are bound to create a cultural and economic transition within these long neglected areas all over Denmark, Sweden, Poland, Lithuania and Germany. They do so by devoting themselves to a new kind of luxury and in finding everything where there is supposedly nothing. Some contemoraries feel tempted to tease those Hinterland-explorers as a rather freakish kind of folk. How can you bear this non-existing comfort?

And even those, who grew up with this kind of rural lifestyle are part of the change, as they have noticed that change is unumgänglich. Their ancestors being farmers, they now start to organize operas and festivals in the middle of nowhere and hosting guests. Because these houses are not meant for one family. Not back then, not now. Manorial heritage might be still considered as a rather posh setting for countrylife-ambitions, but the new owners are nevertheless an example for a rather humble view of things in trying to make those houses economically worthy. This includes the appreciation of a work-life-balance, a longing for peace, for family activities, being less driven by money and seeking pleasure in things we cannot buy or make hold of: such as nature, silence and time. Manor houses have become an icon of a long lost time, where there was an appreciation of what we might call a decent life in an agricultural microcosm, of hard work and commitment. However, some things might have change for the worse, some have changed for the better. No matter what condition these houses might be in today, some features will never be outdated: they delight, they remind, they astonish – each one in it‘s individual way.

With this project, I not just want to travel back in time, I also want to turn to you, in order to find out, how does this topic related to us, the „normal“ people? Those, who will never be able -or never even want to – own such a manor house. How can we experience them, nevertheless? I want you to follow me and find the ones, who have managed the transition of giving those old houses a new life. Who like to get to know you likewise, who want you to come over and visit them, to share the joy over this beauty, of its story and feel the vibe of past days. Let us exlore the Baltic „manorscape“, as our Danish collegues dubbed this vast area of historic heritage. Old places, new life ! Get inspired and who knows – maybe you will even discover your new self within this historic setting. You wouldn’t be the first to get attached.

What if all historic houses would vanish? Can you imagine that?

Would you recocnize if there’d be no more churches, no half-timbered houses, no brick barns, no cottages, no manor houses, no castles? Whenever an old house is being teared off – no matter how shabby it looked –  I am grieving for the loss of history that has been buried. Being brought up in the rather rural part of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, the farest Eastern part of Germany and former GDR-Territory, my eyes are familiar with villages dominated by red bricks and half-timbered houses. I mainly grew up in a WBS-70s panel. I was never specifically trained to pay attention to old buildings, I cannot recall someone saying to me: Look at this beauty! Have you noticed the lovely beaver tails shingles! And oh, that iron piece of art of a frontdoorknob, marvelous!

For as long as I remember I feel an inexplicable fondness of historic houses to an extent that could probably best compared to the love of distant but dear relatives – your fathers aunt or mothers funky uncle, someone for whom you feel this deep affection for. Those ones with an outstanding character, whom you will quote all your life long. Old houses can have the quality of ancestors. If you take an interest in them, they tell you stories of times long gone –  full of wonders, some of bitterness. Of hard work, of times which were shaped a humble attitudes towards life which we as people oft he 21st century can hardly imagine. They give us hints on how life was being lived by then, some of it we still continue to adapt, just like using clay and reed for the walls, but you (probably) never ever again find a contemporary house with ceilings charmed by stucco.

Houses don’t care about people, though. It’s a oneside love, unconditional, in a way. But as they give you this pleasant shiver you start to think the house wants you to linger a little more. Because otherwise it would make no sense. You start to think, that the house needs you, although it is rather true that you need an excuse for the feelings which seem to come out of the blue. I guess it is no daring to say that the majestatic appearance of a manor houses will never stop to impress us. And as your eyes wander around it you start to wonder, what the former owners were like, whose children were born under this roof, what fights might have been fought, what promises were made. You try to imagine the cheerful moments of peace and candlelight, you want to listen to stories which were told around the fireplace. You try to imagine suffering refugees this house has sheltered, silent but firm during years of war.

To this day manor houses spread this athmosphere of legends, of hidden secrets, which you want to find out about while you admire those old beaver tail shingles, who are covered with bits of moss which have been lying up there for more than a hundred years. And you think of the strength of each single shingle which gave it’s best to protect the house against all kinds of wetness and winds, just like those houses resisted the changes of times and seasons. Some of them for more than 400 years, other „only“  for 170. And before you realise it, you fall in love. You start to care about the house which might be a ruin still. You want to protect it, you want to maintain it, you even imagine to live in it. Perhaps that’s their secret for their staying power: Their unique beauty, which will never be found likewise in a new build house.

You can call me nostalgic, or oldschool. I like vintage, I like antiques. I like the smell of a dusty attic, old wood. I like Vinyl, I like Oldtimer, I love books. I have too many of them yet unread, but the way they hold words pressed into paper like tattoo they appear as an antidote to this ultimate loss of substance as the world turns faster and starts to move into a sphere where we start to mainly live on a screen. I like to stress, though, that by all my fondness of the past, I consider myself as a modern person – I am a huge fan of Spotify,  I even adapted to Online-Banking and to smartphones. I like Instagram and recently I fell for an Austrian hipsterband.

So who am I?

Hi there! I am Annika. Journalist, countryside-bigcity-hybrid, Hinterland-explorer. I have the privilege to take you with me on my excursion through the Baltic Hinterland as an official ambassador of Baltic manor houses due to this fantastic EU-Project. What Hinterland, you might wonder? The term originates in the German language but has been adapted by several European fellow countries way back in the 19th century, as L’hinterland by our French neighbours or, even more fancy, as Hinterlândia. The Hinterland is characterised as a rather rural area with poor infrastructure, far away from cities and limited possibilities to make a living. But these days, it is the place to be when it comes to vacation-adventures which are meant to leave an impact on you.

The Hinterland might be poor of Sea water but it’s rich of inspiring people who are bound to create a cultural and economic transition within these long neglected areas all over Denmark, Sweden, Poland, Lithuania and Germany. They do so by devoting themselves to a new kind of luxury and in finding everything where there is supposedly nothing. Some contemoraries feel tempted to tease those Hinterland-explorers as a rather freakish kind of folk. How can you bear this non-existing comfort?

And even those, who grew up with this kind of rural lifestyle are part of the change, as they have noticed that change is unumgänglich. Their ancestors being farmers, they now start to organize operas and festivals in the middle of nowhere and hosting guests. Because these houses are not meant for one family. Not back then, not now. Manorial heritage might be still considered as a rather posh setting for countrylife-ambitions, but the new owners are nevertheless an example for a rather humble view of things in trying to make those houses economically worthy. This includes the appreciation of a work-life-balance, a longing for peace, for family activities, being less driven by money and seeking pleasure in things we cannot buy or make hold of: such as nature, silence and time. Manor houses have become an icon of a long lost time, where there was an appreciation of what we might call a decent life in an agricultural microcosm, of hard work and  commitment. However, some things might have change for the worse, some have changed for the better. No matter what condition these houses might be in today, some features will never be outdated: they delight, they remind, they astonish – each one in it‘s individual way.

With this project, I not just want to travel back in time, I also want to turn to you, in order to find out, how does this topic related to us, the „normal“ people? Those, who will never be able -or never even want to – own such a manor house. How can we experience them, nevertheless? I want you to follow me and find the ones, who have managed the transition of giving those old houses a new life. Who like to get to know you likewise, who want you to come over and visit them, to share the joy over this beauty, of its story and feel the vibe of past days. Let us exlore the Baltic „manorscape“, as our Danish collegues dubbed this vast area of historic heritage. Old places, new life ! Get inspired and who knows – maybe you will even discover your new self within this historic setting. You wouldn’t be the first to get attached.

2020-02-04T13:05:07+01:00